Candidate To Watch: Chris Anderson (Baltimore City Council District 7)

Chris Anderson is a U.S. Coast Guard veteran, chaplain, and lifelong Baltimorean. He is running to represent District 7 on Baltimore’s City Council.

My grandfather, Christopher Bland, had an eatery on Riggs Avenue & Carey Street in Baltimore’s 7th District. Bland’s Carryout was a family business that helped the community, as well as fed it. I used to play in front of Carryout as a child.  Now that store is gone. A child can’t play in front of that building anymore. There are memorials in front of that store now where people have been shot and have died from street violence.

Photograph credit: Chris Anderson

Now, in 2020, I’m one of nine Republican, African American candidates running for office in Baltimore; I’m running in the 7th district.

I do not want to see another street memorial in front of my grandfather’s store. I want children to be able to play there again.  I want that community to heal. Some say I’m too serious about this race and am angry.  Others associate my party and me with the “Grand Old Party” (GOP) of 1967 and say we don’t have a chance.

I am very angry and I am very serious about the conditions of District 7, but I’m not the return of the GOP to the city. I’m part of the “Grand New Party” that’s frustrated, mad and angry (yes!) about how far this city has fallen.

I feel the pain of Michelle Andrews running in District 6. 

I’m just as frustrated as Jovani Patterson, nominee for City Council President.

I’m just as mad as the first African-born nominee, Eugene Boikai, running in District 12. 

These are just some of the Republicans that are running for office frustrated by the conditions and deterioration of Baltimore City. This city is predominantly Democrat, but I know most of the city residents are just as fed up with how this city is governed.

In a survey from Morgan State University:

“A vast majority of participants (more than 90%) describe Baltimore’s crime rate as high when given a choice between high, moderate, low and ‘no description.’ Participants provided no single explanation for what the majority believed to be a high crime rate. Instead, they provided varying explanations, ranging from drugs and lack of economic opportunity…”

Institute For Urban Research, March 26, 2020

Most are not going to take drastic steps like joining the Republican Party for change; those same people should not see us who join the Party with the intent to hurt the City.

Abandoned factory/plant in Baltimore.

I’m just as concerned with boarded-up houses, abandon schools, and government corruption in City Hall as most of the citizens of Baltimore.

We need a change. I am part of that change needed for Baltimore’s District 7. 

I didn’t put my name on the ballot for status quo or to inflate my ego. I’m running for office to bring communities back. Communities should not have to witness another black life gunned down in front of any store in Baltimore. I am not part of the “Grand Old Party” and old ways of doing things; I, with my colleagues, are part of a new party that wants fiscal responsibility in City Hall, anti-corruption put in place, and to see this city grow again.

I want to see stores, like my grandfather’s Carryout, build generational wealth in District 7 again. I’m part of new solutions and new ideas.  I’m with the “Grand New Party.”

Chaplain Christopher Anderson
Nominee,  Baltimore City Council  District 7

Website:  http://www.chrisanderson2020.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chrisanderson2020
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/CAnderson2020
Donate: https://secure.anedot.com/people-for-chris-anderson/chrisanderson2020

References:

  1. Photograph credit: https://allthatsinteresting.com/abandoned-baltimore-ghetto-photos
  2. https://issuu.com/morganstateu/docs/dojpolicereport?fr=sYzIxMzEyNTEzNzg

Opinion: Takoma Park Politicos Are Anti-Business

From A Small Business Owner in Montgomery County, Maryland.

I want to discuss the real-world effects of the $15.00 per hour wage.

As a small business owner in Montgomery County, Maryland my business feels the negative effects of the new law initiated by County Executive Marc Elrich and his Takoma Park delegation. Fifteen dollars sounds good to the employee working at fast food and entry-level jobs, but the minimum salary requirement has consequential effects to the small business owner who is dependent on labor to operate his business. Fast food restaurants and box stores have circumvented the effects of the raise in minimum wage by installing kiosk machines, thereby eliminating labor costs.

Have you also noticed the dollar menu has gone away and prices have increased on most items? 

Contrary to activist politicians who have never owned businesses, businesses are not created to provide jobs and benefits to the population, but rather to turn a profit. This involves managing overhead, which includes labor and employee costs. The majority of the general public do not realize that labor costs are minimally 20% higher than the actual wage paid. When you factor in unemployment, workers’ compensation, and social security matching, the increase is about 20%. If you add in mandatory sick leave required by Montgomery County (thanks to Marc Elrich and his Takoma Park associates) and health insurance, then the employer’s cost for an employee raises significantly. 

So, what are the business owner’s options?

  1. They can raise their prices to compensate for the labor increases.
  2. They can absorb the loss.
  3. They can leave Montgomery County.
  4. They can go out of business. 

When you have career politicians who have no experience at running a business, you create an anti-business climate. 

I highly value my employees. I am careful to hire and retain hard working, loyal, ethical, and moral individuals. As my business is labor intensive, I pay my employees a fair wage between $25.00 and $30.00 per hour. Because of my size, however, I am unable to absorb the cost for health insurance or a 401k.

Let’s now discuss the graduated expectations of minimum wage.

What politicians need to realize is that minimum wage jobs are entry-level positions. People who need additional wages need to find a trade or seek advanced education. The message that is not told when raising the minimum wage is the graduated expectations that employees have. The employee making $25.00 and $30.00 per hour now expects $30.00 to $35.00 to keep up with the graduated expectation of minimum wage. Bear in mind a wage of $35.00 per hour is actually $45.00 per hour. Think about that the next time you pay $7.00 for a fast food hamburger and $4.00 for a tomato because the laborer in the field was paid $15.00 per hour.  

During the County’s public hearing to debate raising minimum wage and mandatory sick leave, the sessions were (unsurprisingly) heavily stacked with political activists who have never owned businesses or worked for profit. The voices of business owners were silenced by outcries of naïve politicians opposed to capitalism and clueless of how to run a successful business.

Montgomery County is controlled by the activists of Takoma Park and they are not friendly to small business. Most recently we have seen this negative attitude towards business communicated in the forced, unjustified closures of many small businesses because of the alleged dangers of COVID-19.

Interesting how one can be safe from infection while shopping in Walmart and Home Depot but not in Joe’s Boutique. Again, it’s political activists with no business experience making the rules. 

Response to MoCo Executive Elrich’s EO 87-20

From a Small Business Owner in Montgomery County, Maryland.

According to the Montgomery County Department of Alcohol Beverage Services, there are 1,050 liquor license holders in Montgomery County, Maryland. This number does not include the thousands of food-only service businesses in Montgomery County. HHS claims they’ve closed or cited 8 restaurants/bars total in Montgomery County for failure to abide by COVID-19 regulations. Of these 8, HHS cannot confirm how many of them held liquor licenses.

Now, every establishment that serves alcohol, including those that pay $2,500.00 per year for an extended license to serve alcohol between 12:00 am-2:00 am on the weekends, are being forced to stop serving at 10:00 pm.

With all the millions being spent on contact tracing, one would think it would be fairly easy to identify establishments not adhering to the regulations.

The County charged existing businesses additional fees for new applications to conduct business during COVID-19; they are doing all they can to hurt businesses with policies that don’t make anyone safer. This is another chip away at our freedoms and another step towards complete government control.

Original Press Release: https://www2.montgomerycountymd.gov/mcgportalapps/Press_Detail.aspx?Item_ID=25677

Executive Order 87-20: https://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/exec/Resources/Files/orders/087-20.pdf